Saturday, February 24, 2018

Take Every Penny The Broward County Sheriff Deputy Four Have



By Robert Wenzel

We now learn that while the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in  Parkland Florida were taking place, four Broward County Sheriff’s deputies hid behind cars instead of entering the high school and confronting the killer, Nikolas Cruz.

Yes, four deputies who pledge to "protect the people" failed miserably in protecting high school youth and school personnel. This is a remarkable dereliction of duty.

Indeed, sources from Coral Springs, Fla., police department tell CNN that when its officers arrived on the scene on the day of the shootings, they were shocked to find three Broward County Sheriff’s deputies behind their cars with weapons drawn.

The Coral Springs cops entered the building to engage the shooter on their own, before other Broward County deputies arrived, two of whom joined the police inside, the sources said.

Coral Springs City Manager Mike Goodrum confronted Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel during a vigil for victims the next day, saying students could have been dying in the school while the deputies held back.

The next day, Coral Springs Police Chief Tony Pustizzi wrote in an internal e-mail that “another agency has given the impression that it had provided the majority of the rescue efforts.”

“Please know that this issue will be addressed, and the truth will come out in time,” he wrote.

Most outrageous, the school’s armed resource officer, Broward County Sheriff’s Deputy Scot Peterson, was among those outside. He resigned on Thursday after his failure to act was publicly revealed. Here's the thing, he retires with his full pension benefits.

It is instructive to consider what would happen if this occurred in a Private Property Society. First, it would be recognized that protection officers that failed to protect broke a contract. No one is forcing anyone in a PPS to join and take on the dangerous work required a protection service personnel but if one does there would be obligations to actually protect.

No one breaking such a contract would have the option of retiring with full benefits, he and his security firm would most likely be sued for every penny they had, perhaps after a trial thrown in jail or maybe hung high.

Will this occur with a government police force? Highly unlikely, they protect their own first, not the people.

Robert Wenzel is Editor & Publisher of  EconomicPolicyJournal.com and Target Liberty. He also writes EPJ Daily Alert and is author of The Fed Flunks: My Speech at the New York Federal Reserve Bank. Follow him on twitter:@wenzeleconomics and on LinkedIn. His youtube series is here: Robert Wenzel Talks Economics. The Robert Wenzel podcast is on  iphone and stitcher.

18 comments:

  1. This is a bit harsh. It would be nice if police would respond to ALL situations by cowering behind their cars.

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  2. The courts have decided many times over that police have no obligation, no duty, to protect anyone.

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    1. Exactly Jimmy, they have no duty to protect, they are simply around to collect revenue.
      Nothing will come of this that will be a net good. Folks will forget cops can’t protect you.
      The government can’t protect you, and it’s not in the States best interest to protect you. The weaker we are the better they are.
      Don’t be a wuss, buy a gun and protect you and yours, yourself. And I’m not against protecting your neighbor too. Nothing wrong with being a good (S)american.

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  3. Historically didn't governments shoot draftees for cowardice?

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    1. For not killing for government sure. For refusing to protect mundanes, I can't think of a case.

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  4. Perhaps someone should make a film about the Florida shooting and call it "Paths of Glory 2".

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paths_of_Glory

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  5. Coward County Sheriff's Dept.
    "To self-protect and self-serve"

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  6. Scot Peterson got out of prison and works as a FL cop??

    (/s)

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  7. Why does Broward County sound so familiar?

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  8. They did the same thing at Columbine; waited outside while listening to the gunshots. People who are guaranteed a government paycheck will always be mediocre at best.

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  9. Would individuals expect an individual firefighter to enter a burning building without proper equipment?

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    1. The cops didn’t have body armor and guns? Of course they did. Or is that only the gear they wear to shoot unarmed people?

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    2. Let’s assume a firefighter was at a school teaching fire safety. He brought his helmet and a pump can. Is he expected to run into a fully involved wing of the building if it catches fire with the equipment on hand?

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    3. Don’t know if the firefighter is. But he might. Especially if he is a volunteer. But instead of assuming something that could happen, let’s stick to what did. The cop that was on guard was there to be on guard to protect the school, and had been for 6 years I believe. I assume he had a weapon, body armor, training, and had been paid for 32 years to be an officer. Now he is retired and will receive his full retirement package. And he can not be held liable for not protecting the kids at the school.
      The State not only can’t protect you, it’s not in its best interest to protect you. It obviously wasn’t in the best interest of this officer to protect the kids at the school either.
      Or are you saying that he wasn’t armed well enough since he only had a pistol?

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    4. the CORAL SPRINGS officer who was at the school tending the baseball field ..ran to help in flip flops UNARMED...when he got to the bldg he was given a revolver from other CORAL SPRINGS officers and THEY entered the bldg..BC officers protected their 'rear ends'....imho

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  10. I’m saying maybe he believed he wasn’t armed or equipped well enough for what he perceived the situation to be. Maybe he wasn’t really there to protect the school at all. Maybe he was there to just talk about all the usual gov talking points.
    I’m also saying the State can’t protect you just like it can’t provide healthcare etc. I agree it’s not necessarily in its best interest. Anyone believing so is naive.

    If a hazmat incident happened at a school most would not expect the first arriving firefighters to enter the building. They are going to wait till the Hazmat team/equipment arrives.

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  11. What would happen in this scenario?
    The first four deputies make entry into the school attempting to confront the shooter instead of forming a perimeter. Since there was no perimeter set by the initial deputies the shooter slips across the street to a another school, daycare, etc shooting additional individuals. Would this also be considered a dereliction of duty? Does it become a question of who they have a first duty to protect?

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    1. the first 4 HEARD shots being fired...their training REQUIRES them to engage the shooter...NOW

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